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On the Minpaku Law 2018,June 15 th

The new Minpaku law takes effect on June 15 th, 2018. But what does it mean for you if you host?

Under the new law, we are permitted to host 180 nights per guest house. Violation of this could lead to a hefty fine.

As others have pointed out, cities can impose their own rules ( if there are problems). As I understand the law, there must be existing problems.

The law as I view it, is quite sympathetic in tone towards Minpaku, while trying to appease the Japanese Hotel Association.

There are ways of skirting this law if you are willing to take that risk. Charging one price, while claiming another. Having a loved one start another Airbnb account as a host if that becomes an issue.

Of course we all pay our taxes!

The law is vague. Knowing Japan, perhaps intentionally so. Abe himself and the federal government in general are tacitly in favor of us. We are a need until summer of 2020.

The government I’m sure gets donations from the very powerful hotel association of Japan, so they at least need to appear to be appeasing them.

I’m cautiously optimistic that we will all be permitted to continue despite local rhetoric. What is said, is often not the reality, in Japan.

Keeping face, and the appearance of complying is all important, as long as we, nor the government, do not flaunt that we are not exactly keeping to the bargain.

Japan needs tourist income! There is not enough accommodation. We are going to see more Minpaku not less. I’m not a lawyer, so this is not legal advice. But my advice is, stay the course, unless TOLD OTHERWISE.

I suspect that after the Olympics we will be closed down, or the authorities will actually enforce the rules. Until then, don’t piss off the neighbors and you should be fine.

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I`m a Non-Resident of Canada do I need to pay taxes on Mutual Fund Investments?

I`m a non-resident of Canada, do I need to pay taxes in Canada on the mutual fund money I made there? I`m a permanent resident of Japan, but a Canadian citizen.

Answer from a Mutual Fund Advisor in Canada:

Hi Kevin,

As a non-resident all capital gains came tax free to you. If there were any interest or dividend income the withholding tax was deducted at the source by the fund companies, so you have no tax liability now from these investments here in Canada.

Only the fund companies (not the dealer) send out transaction confirmations for non-registered (open) investments.

Happy New Year!

Thanks,

Jonathan Larson

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Have a spare room?

Have a spare room? You can be an innkeeper in Japan

NIKKEI — JAN 26

Japan will relax hotel regulations later this month to kill two birds with one stone — catering to international tourists’ desire to experience Japanese life and culture and making use of vacant old homes.

The government’s goal of attracting 40 million visitors to Japan in 2020 appears to be on track, with the number exceeding

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The Japan Apologists

There is a group of non-Japanese (foreigners) who look at Japan as this untouchable country.  Japan is perfect.  Or at least, Japan should not be commented upon negatively by non-Japanese, as we are guests here.

I have lived here for 28 years.  I`m an immigrant.  If there is injustice in Canada, I will speak out about it or write about it, and I do.   I do the same in Japan.  But these immigrants to Japan, do not like this when other immigrants do this.   They feel we are guests.  Guests should respect the host, even if the host is embarrassing himself in front of his guests, and is acting badly.  I disagree.     Read More

be-careful-watch-your-step-sign-s-4422

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Henna Gaijin and the Black Face Issue

Some Japanese love to emphasize the other or otherness. One often hears the phrase: “ Ware ware Nihonjin ha….” – We Japanese……

The thrust being that all Japanese are the same and think as one. The black face issue is another one that is a good example of how some Japanese look at Japanese people and the Rest of the World. Or for example Africans or African North Americans.

The biggest hotel in Machida, the Rembrandt

Some Japanese feel a sense of uniqueness, and that has led to another term. Henna gaijin- or strange foreigner. This refers to long term expats who have chosen to make Japan home.

As Japanese are such amazingly unique people, only strange ( unique) foreigners could possibly thrive here.

*Either that, or these Japanese have to face the fact that they are not so unique.

We are all humans.

That idea is threatening to some Japanese. They like to feel they are unique.

Black Face issue in Japan

Pictured: Machida, Tokyo

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All Japan Ice Hockey Championship

Semifinals will be played in Tokyo on Saturday

12/16 from 12:30. There will be two games. It’s great hockey!

At Dydo Drink Arena in Higashi Fushimi

Access

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On doing Triathlons in Japan

Dear Reader,

get off your butt!!! If I may say so.

It`s good to hear you are considering doing a triathlon. Work off that beer gut! Most of the info about races in Japan is in Japanese, but the Japanese Triathlon Union (JTU) has some English info. Here is the link.

The triathlon season in Japan runs from April to September, and most races fill up pretty quickly these days. Oshima is a good first race. There are only about 300 participants in the main field, plus relay and ‘sprint’ race. All the races I know of until August are full, but there are some smaller races. Unfortunately, I don’t know much about these. Tri-X has a list of all the races, but it is in Japanese.

I would recommend a better known race as the organisation is usually better. The main race at the end of the season is in Murakami, Niigata. It is a great race, but quite a big field.

Gear
The main gear you need for a race is a wetsuit (usually compulsory in Japan) and obviously a bike. Those are the two main expenses.

On Triathlons in Japan

The shortest distance in Japan is “sprint” distance. The next distance is Olympic or “standard”. The distances are:

Sprint – Swim 750m, Bike 20km, Run 5km
Olympic – Swim 1500m, Bike 40km, Run 10km

Olympic distance is by the far the most common in Japan; there are far fewer sprint distance events. Two that spring to mind are the Yokohama race in the middle of June and the Oshima race in early June. Yokohama is a huge event for the Olympic distance, but the sprint is smaller. Oshima is a more low-key event. There are other races, but you need to search the race calendar. Here is this year’s calendar (in Japanese).

Important

There are some basic things you need for a race. Apart from a bike, you need a wetsuit as they are compulsory for races in Japan. You also need to join the Japan Triathlon Union, although a few races allow day membership. To enter, you usually need to plan several months ahead. As with most events, they sell out very quickly.

Hal Smith

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